Taijitu

A taijitu (simplified Chinese: 太极图; traditional Chinese: 太極圖; pinyin: tàijítú; Wade–Giles: t'ai⁴chi²t'u²) is a symbol or diagram ( ) in Chinese philosophy representing Taiji (太极 tàijí "great pole" or "supreme ultimate") representing both its monist (wuji) and its dualist (yin and yang) aspects. Such a diagram was first introduced by Song Dynasty philosopher Zhou Dunyi (周敦頤 1017–1073) in his Taijitu shuo 太極圖說. The modern Taoist canon, compiled during the Ming era, has at least half a dozen variants of such taijitu. The two most similar are the "Taiji Primal Heaven" (太極先天圖 tàijí xiāntiān tú) and the "wuji" (無極圖 wújí tú) diagrams, both of which have been extensively studied during the Qing period for their possible connection with Zhou Dunyi's taijitu.Ming period author Lai Zhide (1525–1604) simplified the taijitu to a design of two interlocking spirals. →Wikipedia


太极图太極圖Yin und Yangতাই চি রেখাচিত্র太極図Thái cực đồتاجيتوਥਾਇਚੀਥੂ

Depicted in

Notitia dignitatum, etc.
manuscript1436

Email Facebook Reddit Tumblr Twitter